What are Humans?

Jeremy Atticus Finch the eldest child and only son of Atticus. The older brother of “Scout” and constant partner in crime. As many young people do at their age they create mischief together and get into trouble together. But you see a distinctive difference between these two siblings and all the other children in their school.

Jem is the typical big brother and American kid. He shares and plays with his sister, but grows out of the childish games first. He makes his own friends, but he faces the same issues as Scout does as his father becomes the attorney of a black man. He feels the sting of his classmates as they use derogatory names for his father. He’s a protector and a companion for Scout more than any thing. When he’s moved up form the children’s table to the adult table Scout feels abandoned. Especially since her aunt likes to confront Scout about her tomboy behavior and her newly acquired dirty mouth. In this situation Scout didn’t become involved with his sister because he was already accepted in the adult circle. Scout was left to defend her fathers name on her own against a stuck up cousin who looked down on him because he was representing a black man..

In this case is was Scouts job to learn when to fight and when she should take a step back and ignore the chiding a younger poorly educated and biased cousin. Jem as the story goes along becomes more of a figure  of maturity in the face of judgement. He doesn’t understand why people speak about his father the way they do, but he does understand why his father is the way he is. He starts to understand the reason behind his fathers actions. This also leads to a greater understanding of the people around him. He starts to see the greater injustices and understands the comment his father makes about killing a Mocking Bird being a sin.

He grows up and just like his sister he grows to understand people and they see how others can hurt one another or save one another. The concept of the frailty of human opinion and how easy it is for some to destroy others.

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The “Father”

Atticus Fischer the father of Scout and Jem, a humble local defense lawyer who tries to earn an honest living for his small family. The bread winner and the typical patriarchal figure depicted in many of these more traditional classic novels. Yet, does he really fill that role as completely as it seems. He brings money home and he teaches his children right from wrong, but is he leading down  a difficult path that they might not be able to traverse.

Living in a society were the color of your skin makes you a better person is very difficult for some one with a very fair personality. Some one who doesn’t see skin color or race all he sees is justice and need. Little by little introducing his young children to the real world. From his young daughters point of view he seems like a boring man who never does anything interesting or worth noticing, all she does hear form her fellow classmates are bad things about him representing an African American.

African American members of ILGWU Local 222 pi...

African American members of ILGWU Local 222 picket outside. (Photo credit: Kheel Center, Cornell University)

Now here’s were we reach  a barricade when it came to this book. It’s very well written and its easy to follow and understand, but within this book is the prevalent use of a derogatory term for people of the African American race. I’m shore you know what word I’m talking about. I don’t have to write it. If you don’t know read the book!! I found the use of the word in no way overly used or abused. It was not used just to cause controversy, or to be used as liberally as profanity and ugly words are used in the media today. I in no way condone the use of this kind of language, but I don’t deny the fact that I use profanity,  I believe there’s a level of respect you should have for your fellow human beings, no matter what race or nationality they are. In this sense the use of the word, in this story, is more artistic than offensive.

The young impressionable girl learns some truths about her father she never knew. She sees his struggle to maintain normalcy within his family and teach them that what every one else is doing is not always right and you should stand up for what you believe in. He is an example of an intelligent gentleman who knows how to shoot a shot gun and stand behind his beliefs even confronted with his own racist neighbors.

I appreciate his strong character and the image that his children grow to have of him as they mature and they get  a better understanding. It reflects what we learn as we grow up to understand our own parents. The reasons behind the things they do and the decisions they make. We never really understand them until we’re older and we look at things trough a slightly different perspective.